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000_1JV4WI.jpg0 viewsThis photograph taken on August 30, 2019 shows a tourist walking past a portrait of Vietnam's revolutionary leader Ho Chi Minh for sale at a shop in the old quarters of Hanoi. - September 2, 2019 marks 50 years since the death of Vietnam's revolutionary leader Ho Chi Minh, whose embalmed corpse is visited by millions annually at a stately mausoleum in Hanoi. (Photo by Nhac NGUYEN / AFP)
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000_1JV4WD.jpg0 viewsThis photograph taken on August 30, 2019 shows a shopkeeper posing with bust of Vietnam's revolutionary leader Ho Chi Minh for sale at a shop in the old quarters of Hanoi. - September 2, 2019 marks 50 years since the death of Vietnam's revolutionary leader Ho Chi Minh, whose embalmed corpse is visited by millions annually at a stately mausoleum in Hanoi. (Photo by Nhac NGUYEN / AFP)
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000_1JU724.jpg0 viewsJustin Welby (L), the Archbishop of Canterbury, and Archbishop of Colombo Malcolm Ranjith lay flower as they pay homage to victims of the Easter Sunday bomb attacks during a visit at St. Sebastian's Church in Negombo on August 29, 2019. - The Easter Sunday suicide attacks targeted churches and luxury hotels killing 258 people in Sri Lanka on April 21. (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI / AFP)
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000_1JU72C.jpg0 viewsJustin Welby (C), the Archbishop of Canterbury, kneels down next to Archbishop of Colombo Malcolm Ranjith (C) during his visit at St. Sebastian's Church in Negombo on August 29, 2019. - The Easter Sunday suicide attacks targeted churches and luxury hotels killing 258 people in Sri Lanka on April 21. (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI / AFP)
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000_1JU6XQ.jpg0 viewsJustin Welby (L), the Archbishop of Canterbury, and Archbishop of Colombo Malcolm Ranjith (2L) hold flowers as they pay homage to victims of the Easter Sunday bomb attacks during a visit at St. Sebastian's Church in Negombo on August 29, 2019. - The Easter Sunday suicide attacks targeted churches and luxury hotels killing 258 people in Sri Lanka on April 21. (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI / AFP)
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000_1JU6X9.jpg0 viewsJustin Welby (L), the Archbishop of Canterbury, speaks with Senara Sewwandi (16), a survivor of the Easter Sunday bomb attacks, during a visit at St. Sebastian's Church in Negombo on August 29, 2019. - The Easter Sunday suicide attacks targeted churches and luxury hotels killing 258 people in Sri Lanka on April 21. (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI / AFP)
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000_1JU6WL.jpg0 viewsJustin Welby (L), the Archbishop of Canterbury, speaks with Shanuranga Himasha(9), a survivor of the Easter Sunday bomb attacks during a visit at St. Sebastian's Church in Negombo on August 29, 2019. - The Easter Sunday suicide attacks targeted churches and luxury hotels killing 258 people in Sri Lanka on April 21. (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI / AFP)
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000_1JU6W7.jpg0 viewsJustin Welby (2L), the Archbishop of Canterbury, arrives with Archbishop of Colombo Malcolm Ranjith (2R) during a visit at St. Sebastian's Church in Negombo on August 29, 2019. - The Easter Sunday suicide attacks targeted churches and luxury hotels killing 258 people in Sri Lanka on April 21. (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI / AFP)
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000_1JU6V8.jpg0 viewsJustin Welby (L), the Archbishop of Canterbury, arrives with Archbishop of Colombo Malcolm Ranjith (R) during a visit at St. Sebastian's Church in Negombo on August 29, 2019. - The Easter Sunday suicide attacks targeted churches and luxury hotels killing 258 people in Sri Lanka on April 21. (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI / AFP)
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000_1JU6S7.jpg0 viewsJustin Welby (C), the Archbishop of Canterbury, leads prayers with Archbishop of Colombo Malcolm Ranjith (R) for victims of the Easter Sunday bomb attacks during a visit at St. Sebastian's Church in Negombo on August 29, 2019. - The Easter Sunday suicide attacks targeted churches and luxury hotels killing 258 people in Sri Lanka on April 21. (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI / AFP)
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000_1JU6R1.jpg0 viewsJustin Welby (C), the Archbishop of Canterbury, leads prayers with Archbishop of Colombo Malcolm Ranjith (2R) for victims of the Easter Sunday bomb attacks during a visit at St. Sebastian's Church in Negombo on August 29, 2019. - The Easter Sunday suicide attacks targeted churches and luxury hotels killing 258 people in Sri Lanka on April 21. (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI / AFP)
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000_1JU6LO.jpg0 viewsJustin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, pays homage to victims of the Easter Sunday bomb attacks in Sri Lanka during his visit at St. Sebastian's Church in Negombo on August 29, 2019. - The Easter Sunday suicide attacks targeted churches and luxury hotels killing 258 people in Sri Lanka on April 21. (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI / AFP)
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000_1JU6LB.jpg0 viewsJustin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, pays homage to victims of the Easter Sunday bomb attacks in Sri Lanka during his visit at St. Sebastian's Church in Negombo on August 29, 2019. - The Easter Sunday suicide attacks targeted churches and luxury hotels killing 258 people in Sri Lanka on April 21. (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI / AFP)
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000_1JU6DS.jpg0 viewsJustin Welby (C), the Archbishop of Canterbury, and Sri Lankan Catholic Archbishop of Colombo Malcolm Ranjith (R) pay homage to THE April 21 Easter Sunday bomb attacks victims next to a blood-splattered statue of Jesus Christ damaged in the attack, during a visit at St. Sebastian's Church, in Negombo on August 29, 2019. - The Easter Sunday suicide attacks targeted churches and luxury hotels killing 258 people in Sri Lanka on April 21. (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI / AFP)
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000_1HH0SV.jpg2 viewsSri Lankan Catholic Archbishop of Colombo Malcolm Ranjith prays during a mass at St. Anthony's church in Colombo on June 13, 2019, after a series of deadly Easter Sunday blasts targeting churches and luxury hotels. - Sri Lanka's bombed Catholic church was reconsecrated on June 12 with a prayer for a strong national leader to punish those responsible for the Easter attacks that killed 258 people. (Photo by ISHARA S. KODIKARA / AFP)
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000_1H7585.jpg3 viewsA Pakistani customer looks at jewellery at a market ahead of the Eid al-Fitr holiday, in Karachi on June 3, 2019. - Muslims around the world are preparing to celebrate the Eid al-Fitr holiday, which marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan. (Photo by ASIF HASSAN / AFP)
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000_1H757U.jpg3 viewsA Pakistani vendor puts some bangles on a customer's wrist at a market ahead of the Eid al-Fitr holiday, in Karachi on June 3, 2019. - Muslims around the world are preparing to celebrate the Eid al-Fitr holiday, which marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan. (Photo by ASIF HASSAN / AFP)
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000_1GH12F.jpg4 viewsSri Lankan Catholic priests walk past a damaged shop after a mob attack in Minuwangoda on May 15, 2019. - Sri Lankan authorities said on May 15 they had the situation "under control" after mosques and Muslim-owned shops and businesses were targeted in a violent backlash after the Easter Sunday terror attacks. (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI / AFP)
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000_1G7431.jpg12 viewsVandalised shops are seen after clashes erupted between Christian and Muslim communities in Negombo on May 6, 2019. - Sri Lanka's Roman Catholic Church appealed for calm and an alcohol ban on May 6 after clashes between Christians and Muslims in a town scarred by the Easter suicide attacks. Hundreds of security forces entered Negombo to impose a curfew after dozens of Muslim-owned shops, homes and vehicles were attacked. (Photo by STR / AFP)
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000_1G743A.jpg3 viewsVandalised shops are seen after clashes erupted between Christian and Muslim communities in Negombo on May 6, 2019. - Sri Lanka's Roman Catholic Church appealed for calm and an alcohol ban on May 6 after clashes between Christians and Muslims in a town scarred by the Easter suicide attacks. Hundreds of security forces entered Negombo to impose a curfew after dozens of Muslim-owned shops, homes and vehicles were attacked. (Photo by STR / AFP)
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000_1G74RW.jpg1 viewsPakistani vendors sell dates at their shops in Peshawar on May 6, 2019, ahead of the start of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. - Muslims are preparing for Islam's holy month of Ramadan, which is calculated on the sighting of the new moon, and during which they fast from dawn until dusk. (Photo by ABDUL MAJEED / AFP)
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000_1G74RU.jpg0 viewsA Pakistani vendor (L) makes prayer rosary beads at his shop as customers look at them in Peshawar on May 6, 2019, ahead of the start of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. - Muslims are preparing for Islam's holy month of Ramadan, which is calculated on the sighting of the new moon, and during which they fast from dawn until dusk. (Photo by ABDUL MAJEED / AFP)
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000_1G74RT.jpg0 viewsA Pakistani vendor makes prayer rosary beads at his shop in Peshawar on May 6, 2019, ahead of the start of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. - Muslims are preparing for Islam's holy month of Ramadan, which is calculated on the sighting of the new moon, and during which they fast from dawn until dusk. (Photo by ABDUL MAJEED / AFP)
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000_1G74RR.jpg0 viewsA Pakistani vendor makes prayer rosary beads at his shop in Peshawar on May 6, 2019, ahead of the start of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. - Muslims are preparing for Islam's holy month of Ramadan, which is calculated on the sighting of the new moon, and during which they fast from dawn until dusk. (Photo by ABDUL MAJEED / AFP)
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000_1G63O0.jpg2 viewsPakistani Muslims buy food items at a government controlled-price utility store in Islamabad on May 5, 2019, ahead of the start of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. - Muslims are preparing for Islam's holy month of Ramadan, which is calculated on the sighting of the new moon, and during which they fast from dawn until dusk. (Photo by AAMIR QURESHI / AFP)
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000_1G63NY.jpg2 viewsPakistani Muslims buy food items at a government controlled-price utility store in Islamabad on May 5, 2019, ahead of the start of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. - Muslims are preparing for Islam's holy month of Ramadan, which is calculated on the sighting of the new moon, and during which they fast from dawn until dusk. (Photo by AAMIR QURESHI / AFP)
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000_1G63NQ.jpg2 viewsPakistani Muslims wait for transport after buying food items outside a government controlled-price utility store in Islamabad on May 5, 2019, ahead of the start of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. - Muslims are preparing for Islam's holy month of Ramadan, which is calculated on the sighting of the new moon, and during which they fast from dawn until dusk. (Photo by AAMIR QURESHI / AFP)
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000_1G63NF.jpg2 viewsPakistani residents buy dates at a weekly bazaar in Islamabad on May 5, 2019, ahead of the start of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. - Muslims are preparing for Islam's holy month of Ramadan, which is calculated on the sighting of the new moon, and during which they fast from dawn until dusk. (Photo by AAMIR QURESHI / AFP)
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000_1G63ND.jpg2 viewsPakistani residents buy dates at a weekly bazaar in Islamabad on May 5, 2019, ahead of the start of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. - Muslims are preparing for Islam's holy month of Ramadan, which is calculated on the sighting of the new moon, and during which they fast from dawn until dusk. (Photo by AAMIR QURESHI / AFP)
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000_1G63NA.jpg2 viewsPakistani residents buy dates at a weekly bazaar in Islamabad on May 5, 2019, ahead of the start of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. - Muslims are preparing for Islam's holy month of Ramadan, which is calculated on the sighting of the new moon, and during which they fast from dawn until dusk. (Photo by AAMIR QURESHI / AFP)
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000_1G185H.jpg2 viewsSri Lankan Catholic Archbishop of Colombo, Malcolm Ranjith, gestures as he speaks during a press conference in Colombo on April 30, 2019. - Sri Lanka's Catholic Church said public masses will resume May 5 under tight security, two weeks after Easter bombings claimed by the Islamic State group killed 253 people at three churches and three luxury hotels. (Photo by LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI / AFP)
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000_1G20ZS.jpg1 viewsA Sri Lankan vendor shows a full face veil, called a niqab, at a shop selling clothes for Muslim women in Colombo on April 30, 2019. - Religious tensions and a government ban on covering the face since the Easter Sunday suicide attacks have forced conservative Muslim women in Sri Lanka to shun veils, head scarves and long robes in public. (Photo by ISHARA S. KODIKARA / AFP)
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000_1G20ZK.jpg1 viewsA Sri Lankan vendor shows a full face veil, called a niqab, at a shop selling clothes for Muslim women in Colombo on April 30, 2019. - Religious tensions and a government ban on covering the face since the Easter Sunday suicide attacks have forced conservative Muslim women in Sri Lanka to shun veils, head scarves and long robes in public. (Photo by ISHARA S. KODIKARA / AFP)
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000_1G0415.jpg2 viewsThe Archbishop of Colombo, Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith (C), arrives to attend a vigil in memory of the bomb blast victims in Colombo on April 28, 2019, a week after a series of bomb blasts targeting churches and luxury hotels on Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka. - Sri Lanka's churches remained shut on April 28 forcing Christians to say prayers of grief in private over the Easter suicide attacks that the country's Roman Catholic leader called "an insult to humanity". (Photo by Jewel SAMAD / AFP)
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000_1G03YO.jpg1 viewsThe Archbishop of Colombo, Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith (C), arrives to attend a vigil in memory of the bomb blast victims in Colombo on April 28, 2019, a week after a series of bomb blasts targeting churches and luxury hotels on Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka. - Sri Lanka's churches remained shut on April 28 forcing Christians to say prayers of grief in private over the Easter suicide attacks that the country's Roman Catholic leader called "an insult to humanity". (Photo by Jewel SAMAD / AFP)
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000_1G03YM.jpg1 viewsThe Archbishop of Colombo, Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith (C), arrives to attend a vigil in memory of the bomb blast victims in Colombo on April 28, 2019, a week after a series of bomb blasts targeting churches and luxury hotels on Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka. - Sri Lanka's churches remained shut on April 28 forcing Christians to say prayers of grief in private over the Easter suicide attacks that the country's Roman Catholic leader called "an insult to humanity". (Photo by Jewel SAMAD / AFP)
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000_1G03YC.jpg1 viewsThe Archbishop of Colombo, Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith (C), arrives to attend a vigil in memory of the bomb blast victims in Colombo on April 28, 2019, a week after a series of bomb blasts targeting churches and luxury hotels on Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka. - Sri Lanka's churches remained shut on April 28 forcing Christians to say prayers of grief in private over the Easter suicide attacks that the country's Roman Catholic leader called "an insult to humanity". (Photo by Jewel SAMAD / AFP)
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000_1FY551.jpg2 viewsCatholic Archbishop of Colombo, Malcolm Ranjith, looks on as he leaves a foreig media press conference in Colombo on April 26, 2019, following a series of bomb blasts targeting churches and luxury hotels on Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka. - Sri Lanka's Catholic leader said on April 26 he felt "betrayed" by the government's failure to act on warnings that could have prevented the Easter bombings, adding that services would not resume until security could be guaranteed. (Photo by ISHARA S. KODIKARA / AFP)
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000_1FY4UX.jpg1 viewsCatholic Archbishop of Colombo, Malcolm Ranjith, speaks during a foreig media press conference in Colombo on April 26, 2019, following a series of bomb blasts targeting churches and luxury hotels on Easter Sunday in Sri Lanka. - Sri Lanka's Catholic leader said on April 26 he felt "betrayed" by the government's failure to act on warnings that could have prevented the Easter bombings, adding that services would not resume until security could be guaranteed. (Photo by ISHARA S. KODIKARA / AFP)
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